Majors

Jessica Whale (温婕) of class 2011 was a double major in Chinese and German; after two years of language studies at Wooster, she did her junior I.S. on Chinese loan words and went abroad to both Germany and China (CET in Hangzhou, summer 2010) for advanced language training. The courses she took include 220 Being Young in China, 222, Women in Chinese Literature, and 223, Chinese Cinema. Her senior I.S. is an in-depth analysis of Chinese and German environmental discourses on pollution and recycling. She taught English in China after graduation and is currently applying for graduate programs in East Asia Studies in the States.

charlieCharlie Davis (戴伟力) ’12, is a Chinese major and an amateur musician; he took Beginning Chinese on campus and Intermediate Chinese in the summer of 2010 with Wooster Summer in Yunnan language Program; he also took Chinese 220 (Being Young in China) and attended CET Beijing program in the fall of 2010 to achieve near-native proficiency in speaking, and spent 2011 summer living and researching in Beijing and Shanghai, sponsored by a generous grant from Lilly Project. His junior I.S. in which he translated and edited together video and audio clips of documentary clips and footage of the May Fourth movement prepared him for his senior I.S. that examines different Chinese rock-n-roll bands as an important part of the sub- or counter-culture in China. His translation of the song lyrics is excellent; now living in Nashville TN, Charlie is trying to record, publish and distribute the records of the songs his Chinese rock musician friends;

hawwahHawwah LaRoche (罗海娃) ’12, is a double major in Chinese and Art History; she finished her first year Chinese at Wooster and second year intermediate Chinese while in China with the 2010 Wooster Summer in Yunnan Program, partially sponsored by a travel grant from the president discretionary funds; while in Yunnan, she was chosen to appear in the film entitled 假装情侣 The Pretending Lovers, 2011. She took China-related courses in History (with Dr, Gedalecia) and Religious Studies department (Mark Graham) to deepen her knowledge of Chinese culture; Hawwah’s senior I.S. project studies the gender transformation of the Bodhisattva Guanyin 观世音 after Buddhism entered China in the sixth century.

   Adam Jankowski (詹克齐) ’13 is a double major in Chinese and International Relation. He took Beginning Chinese I and II at the college, and Intermediate Chinese I and II while with the 2010 Wooster Summer in Kunming language Program; he took advanced Chinese at Program in China Studies Institute (CSI) at Peking University. His junior IS, written in Chinese, discusses the key events in the history of Sino-U.S. relations. He was a part of 2011 summer English teaching program; the Copeland fund awarded to him in 2012 enabled him to return to Peking University again to conduct research in the Library for his senior I.S., a study of the roles the communist leaders have played to represent the Chinese through their foreign policies in the past half a century; his language training enabled him to analyze political speeches by China’s leaders for subtle changes towards liberalization and globalization; he is currently in George Washington University earning an advanced degree in Asian Studies.

Alexander Turner (艾绿绿), ’13, is a major in Chinese and avid reader of literature. He took Beginning Chinese at Wooster, Intermediate Chinese during 2010 Wooster Summer in Yunnan language program. He took Chinese 220 and 223 (Chinese Cinema), and worked as a teaching apprentice in the FYS “Chinese Box”; he went to China a third time with the summer of 2011 Wooster English teaching internship program, followed by one full year study of advanced Chinese at CIEE Program at Peking University, during which time he achieved near-native proficiency in spoken Chinese and befriended several underground literary writers; in his junior IS he introduces these friends by translating their poems and his senior I.S. further studies these literary youth (文艺青年) by incorporating his interviews with them conducted in Beijing, made possible by a grant from Copeland fund. His superb analysis of their creative writing would not have been possible without his outstanding language skills and his training in literature that cement his friendship with these amateur fiction writers.  “ … All my friends are here. Not that my friends at Wooster no longer exist to me but I have found that I already inherently understand their culture, society, and thoughts because common factors have shaped us. The greatest commonality between myself and my Chinese friends here is our humanity. We do not share a language or culture or society and thus we become mutually fascinating.” Alex is currently working and living in Beijing, still hanging out with his Beijing literary friends.

Caroline Hanson (韩凯琳)  ’13, is a double major in Chinese and Anthropology, and a competitive swimmer. She took advanced Chinese at SIT Yunnan Program, which was her 2nd time in China. She was a part of the 2010 Wooster Summer in Yunnan language program after successfully finishing the first year Chinese; she was an intern of 2011 summer teaching English program in Beijing. During her study abroad in SIT in Yunnan, she became preoccupied with the conditions of women in Lugu Lake area, the Mosuo ethnic minority that became the subject of her junior I.S. Her language proficiency and familiarity with the Mosuo won her a grant of $2,600 from Copeland Funds which enabled her to conduct field research and interviews in Yunnan for her senior I.S. on the impact of tourism on the matriarchal life style of the Mosuo, especially their walking marriage. Her study not only allows her to understand the struggles of the Mosuo but also gives her a new identity as a member of this minority community trying to reinvent themselves through modernity. She is currently teaching in Beijing for VIA Programs: “Hello Professor Wang! I hope you are doing well in Wooster!  I am absolutely loving Beijing!  I love teaching here at the University!!  But I have 500 students which is a ton!!!  I also love the NGO work I am doing here.  I am doing a lot of translating and am in charge of the webpage.  I am also starting to speak with the Beijing hua and have been adopted by a couple families on campus who I tutor for. Also, when are you planning to be back in Beijing?  I look forward to seeing you!  I am definitely going to spend another year in China before I go to Grad school.  I love it in Beijing, but I have a dilemma.  The post that I originally wanted in Shangarila just opened up.  Meaning next year I could live there and help teach local minorities how to work in the tourist industry.  But I do love Beijing.  This is an opportunity I would love to talk out with you.”

Xiaochen Zhang, (张笑尘) ’13, is a double major in Chinese and International Relation. Born in Nanjing, China and brought up in the States since he was three, Xiaochen is a heritage student who has quickly achieve proficiency in spoken and writing Chinese. He has been back to China numerous times, including the 2010 Wooster Summer in Yunnan Program, and the one-month long English teaching internship program in the summer of 2011 in Beijing and Zhengzhou. He took Chinese Cinema (223) and his junior IS (in Chinese) studies the ways the Chinese interact with the locals in Africa and how these interactions are shaped by different economic and political interests; his senior I.S. in Chinese and economics studies how Chinese investments affect African wages; equipped with his empirical data he offers a framework for understanding the pros and cons of China’s FDI (foreign direct investments) in Africa; After graduation, he was an intern at Museum of Art at City of Guangzhou, China and is currently working for Smucker’s.

Ashley Stopka, (许诗蕾) ’13, is a double major in Chinese and mathematics; she wrote her junior IS examining and critically comparing Chinese and U.S. math education, mainly textbooks, for elementary and middle schools; she finished her first year Beginning Chinese at Wooster and went with 2010 Wooster summer in Kunming Program to complete intermediate Chinese I and II, partially sponsored by a travel grant from the president discretionary funds; she took Chinese 220 after she returned and in 2011 she again went to China, Beijing and Zhengzhou, as a member of the four-week English teaching internship program; her writing skill is superb and has a good mastery of Chinese syntax;

federmanMark Federman (费德民) of ’13 is a double major of Chinese and History; he took advanced Chinese at IES Beijing Program, after completing two years of Chinese at the College, in addition to China-related courses in History (Gedalecia); Mark’s junior IS is translation of excerpts from Yan Geling’s novella entitled Flowers of War 《金陵十三钗》that has been adapted into a film, directed by Zhang Yimou; his senior IS studies the complex relations between the nationalist GMT government and the mobsters/gangsters in Shanghai during the 1920s; his language training enabled him to research Chinese newspaper and memoirs that are the foundations for new historical interpretations.

Kathleen Arnold (何爱玲) of ’14 is a Chinese major. She successfully finished her first and second year Chinese. During the summer of 2010, she went to the beautiful city of Guilin, China, and spent time there taking language class to perfect her language skills; Kathy took Chinese 223 and went to China again in the summer of 2012 to take advanced Chinese at China Studies Institute (CSI) at Peking University; for her junior IS, she examines the representations of lesbian life-style in four Chinese narrative films and discusses how these fictional accounts of lesbianism challenge and negotiate the Confucian and patrilineal tradition in contemporary China; her senior I.S. researches the advent of lesbianism in modern China in art, history, media and official discourses.

Adriana Hoak (郝楠) of ’14 is a Chinese major who has successfully completed her Beginning Chinese I and II, as well as Intermediate Chinese I and II at the college; Adriana is also a member of Wooster Swim Team; she took an eight-week total immersion program the summer of 2012 with China Studies Institute (CSI) at Peking University, immediately followed by one full semester advanced Chinese at CET Beijing Program in the fall; her junior I.S. chronicles the key events in history that affect the lives of the educated women in China trying to achieve womanhood under the influence of traditional etiquette and decorum, or even superstition; her senior I.S. titled “What Does Modernity Smell Like: An Analysis on Fragrance Advertising in Modern China,” traces the steps of perfume and fragrance advertisement in modern China.

Susie Ko (郭晓霞) of ’14 is a double major in International Relations and Chinese; clearly the top 5% of the class, she successfully finished her first and second year Chinese at the College, and took Chinese 220, Women in Chinese Literature; Susie plans to study abroad in CET Beijing program in 2013 and achieve proficiency required to undertake research in the language; a good writer in Chinese, Susie writes her junior IS on the works of modern Chinese artist Gu Wenda; her senior I.S. studies the role of censorship in cyberspace as a means of social control in China as a non-democratic nation.

Donald Shobe (苏向东) of ’14 is a double major in Chinese and Spanish; linguistically quite gifted, he successfully finished Beginning and intermediate Chinese here on campus while also excelling in the department of Spanish. Donald is a good writer and very articulate in his papers written for 223, Chinese Cinema. He studies abroad in CET Beijing Program in the spring of 2013 to achieve greater language skills and proficiency; his junior I.S. examines the linguistic properties of Peking local dialect, especially the various uses of “er” (儿化音) which characterize and distinguish Peking dialect from standard Mandarin.

Jack Vandusen (吴大江) of ’14 is a Chinese major, very interested in political issues concerning mainland China such as democracy movement since 1989 and human rights situations; he took Beginning and Intermediate Chinese on campus, as well as Chinese 223 Cinema class, and a number of courses in Chinese history; Jack spent the summer of 2012 with China Studies Institute (CSI) at Peking University for high intermediate Chinese; his junior I.S. examines five Chinese films, made in 1970s through 2010s, for the changes in how the Chinese (directors) reshape the collective memories of Japanese atrocities against the Chinese during WWII; his senior I.S. examines the formation and development of Chinese national identity in Chinese cinema.

Jarid Heffers (何志儒) of ’14 is a major in Chinese and a member of the college football team; he took Beginning and Intermediate Chinese in the past two years, in addition to Chinese 223 and 220, and other China-related courses in history; he spent the summer of 2012 with China Study Institute (CSI) at Peking University for eight weeks for high intermediate Chinese; his junior IS project discusses the myth of communism as presented in films of red classics; he spent one full semester in spring of 2013 at CSI to take place along the path of the Long March by the Red Army; his senior I.S. examines how Chinese communism is elaborated and represented in films as well as interviews with people in China for their opinions of these dramatic representations of Chinese revolution; thanks to Copeland funds, Jarid was able to  travel to China during the winter break of 2013 and interviewed various locals for their views on Chinese Communist Revolution and its fictional representations in film.

Salma Ait Hssayene (艾珊明) of ’15 is a double major in Chinese and Business Economics. An international student from Rabat, Morocco, she has successfully finished Beginning and Intermediate Chinese I and II; prior to coming to Wooster, she worked as an intern for a Chinese organization in Johannesburg South Africa; fluent in Arabic, French and English, she is planning to study abroad in CIEE Shanghai program during junior fall, as she hopes to work and live in China in the near future, driven by a passion for traveling and meeting people of diverse cultural backgrounds; her senior I.S. studies the inherent inequality that peasant workers 民工 pass onto their kids when they move into the cities but are not given full urban status.

Nolan Kokkoris (郭瑞男) of ‘15 is from Central Square, New York.  In addition to being a Chinese major, he is also a member of the Scot Band and is an avid marching band lover. Nolan just finished Beginning and Intermediate Chinese I and II, where he achieved good pronunciation. Coming out of “Chinese Box” FYS, he continued to take Chinese 220 and 223 to expand his cultural and intellectual horizon; and he hopes to spend one full year at AAC program in Beijing in his junior year; his goals are to be fluent in Chinese by the time he graduates and to work for the federal government as a Chinese specialist; his senior I.S. focuses on the formation of Chinese cultural identity as developed among the various pockets of Chinese diaspora community abroad.

novakStephanie Novak (倪琴芳) of 15′ started taking Chinese in her freshmen year; successful in Beginning Chinese I and II (101 and 102); driven by a strong passion for Chinese culture, she continued to excel in Intermediate Chinese I and II (201 and 202) while taking Chinese 222 (Women in Chinese Literature) and 223 (Chinese cinema); Stephanie made good progress in her reading skill and became proficient, able to understand written and spoken Chinese at near-native level; her reading and writing skills in English are equally impressive, able to analyze and interpret literary works with nuance and subtlety; she is planning to study abroad soon to achieve greater proficiency; her junior I.S. focuses on how the Chinese view success in America by examining several films on Chinese coming to America to realize their “American dreams”; her senior I.S. looks at the history of English language education in China, through events such as Western missionary work, early state-sponsored education abroad, all the way to the present in which English language instruction is institutionalized in elementary school education and college entrance exam.

KaufmannMichael Kaufmann (寇若楠) of 16′ has just declared Chinese major, who took beginning Chinese in Cleveland West Lake high school and was directly placed in to intermediate Chinese class here at the College; he has excelled in 201 and 202, driven and motivated by her passion for Chinese culture; by taking second year Chinese in his freshman year, he is most likely to be very proficient and fully communicative in Chinese by the time he graduates.

morrowDavid Morrow (莫达) of 16′ started taking as a freshman, with a strong interests in Chinese language and culture; his choice of Chinese as major is very consistent with his class performance, quizzes and homework in Beginning Chinese I and II; a people person who enjoys social interactions, David plans to major in education as well, hoping to be a teacher after graduation; he was in Beijing with China Studies Institute (CSI) at Peking University for one semester intensive language training; his I.S. project discusses the various ideas of liberal arts education in the comparative contexts of Western philosophy, Chinese history (with regard to the Civil Service Exam system), and educational reforms in modern China.

kellyKelly Brethauer (乐琴灵) of 16′ is a double major in Chinese and economics; with her successful completion of Beginning and Intermediate Chinese I and II in her first year at the College; she had been in China briefly for two weeks when she and her American friends went to a local school to provide study aids to Chinese kids; she was in Beijing again in 2014, taking one semester of intensive language training at China Studies Institute (CSI); since her return, she took Chinese 223 cinema class and Chinese history class; her I.S. examines the changes in Chinese attitude towards nature in the course of Chinese history from antiquity to the present crisis of environmental degradation, and it analyzes such classics as The Book of Changes as well as the revolutionary rhetorics of Mao to see how Chinese change their self-image in relation to Nature.

SheehanMarie Sheehan (习玛丽) of ’17 is majoring in both Chinese and political science; she took four semesters of Chinese at the college and spent one semester abroad in Beijing with China Studies Institute (CSI) taking intensive language classes; in summer of 2016, she attended CET Harbin intensive language program; her I.S. examines the ways a set of political interests shape state-run media such as the printed newspaper and television programs; by looking at official media coverage of natural and man-made disasters, she has gained insights into the strategies of political propaganda with which the central government maintains its legitimacy and controls cultural symbols important to governance.

Megu_ItoMega Ito,  张萌红, of ’18 is a double major in Chinese and communication; she is a student of stella performance and in good academic standing; finished her intermediate and advanced intermediate Chinese at the college, Megu is taking one semester of intensive language training at CSI at History Department of Peking University in the fall of 2016; her joint I.S. examines how public media in China shape national identity in a new age in which sexual scandals of cultural celebrities become ways to democratize China as a mass society.

BrethelWilliam Brethel (白英帅) of 18′ took two years of Chinese at the college with flying colors; he also took other China related course such as Chinese cinema and Chinese history; very active and supportive as a member of Chinese language Suite in Luce; with a strong passion for Chinese culture as well as public service, he took one semester of intensive language class at CSI in China and is returning to CSI this summer again; his junior IS studies key filmic and literary texts that are milestones of women’s political consciousness; he hopes to live and work to help under-privileged kids after he graduates as a Chinese major;

shurelds18

Aki Shurelds (李子平) of ’18 is from the Bay Area of San Francisco, and plans to minor in Business Economics; she completed the beginning and intermediate Chinese at the College, and is currently taking third year language; she plans to study abroad in China in the summer of 2017, and complete her junior I.S. project before the beginning of fall 2017

RodriguezPierce Rodriguez (王一州) of 19′ declares Chinese major due to the ease with which he successfully finished his beginning Chinese class; he is following his linguistic talent and realizing all his intellectual potentials in the years to come; in the summer of 2016, he finished intermediate Chinese at Beloit College; he has also taken courses in Chinese cinema, Food and Religion, in addition to 301 and 302; he plans to study abroad in China after the fall of 2017 in which he takes Chinese 311 Journey to the West;

cook19Sue Cook (古苏) of ’19 is a double major in Chinese and anthropology; she has been a straight “A” student throughout her first and second year Chinese; so far, she has excelled in the language and shows great promise in reading and writing proficiency; in 223, Chinese cinema, she continues to outperforms her classmates in her analysis of film texts, showing mastery of critical skills to understand cultural differences and conflicting values that go into the formation of Chinese identity;

Julia Covallo (柯娃罗) of ’19 is a double major of Chinese and Studio Art; Julia has already successfully finished the first year (two semesters) language with flying color, having mastered the basic skills in listening, reading, writing and speaking; she is taking 201 and 202 before taking one semester of intensive language training at CSI at Peking University in the summer of her junior year; she has already completed required cultural courses in Chinese history and religion (Buddhism);

Benjamin Jenkins (张学友) of ’19 is a double major of Chinese and Physics; Ben was directly placed into second year upon entering into the college as a freshman; since then he has successfully completed 301 and 302 upper level language courses, along with other cultural courses in Chinese history and religion;

Fu Kuang Chien (简辅广) of ’19 was born in Taipei but moved to the U.S. as a little boy; he was directly placed into second year language class and has totally caught up with writing and reading in the language; in terms of speaking and listening, he has near native proficiency;